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College IFlewe. 



Vol. 6. No. 2. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1906. 



Price, 5 Cents. 




MARGUERITE B. MAC KELLAR. 1907, 
President of Barnswallows; 

BARNSWALLOW RECEPTION 

In spite of the rain on Saturday evening, 
October sixth, half- past seven saw the 
Barn apparently full, and streams of girls 
hurrying from all directions towards the 
center of attraction, the first Barnswal- 
lows' reception. Miss Marguerite Mac- 
Kellar. President of the Barnswallows. 
Dean Pendleton, and Miss Davis stood in 
front of the stage receiving the long line of 
new students. 

Before the dancing began. Miss MacKel- 
lar came forward to give to the Class of 
19 1 o its first welcome to the Barn, and to 
give to the other classes the welcome they 
had long learned to expect. Miss Mac- 
Kellar began by saying that she felt very 
much like the country minister who, re- 
turning from a long absence, told his con- 
gregation that it gave him a great and pe- 
culiar happiness to see so many of the good 
old faces he used to shake hands with. 
She spoke of the pleasure it was for the 
Barnswallows to crowd closer together in 
the nest to make room for the new brood. 
iqio will learn to love the Barn, too, like 
the rest of the college, and to wish that 
every night was a Barnswallow night, like 
the little boy who wished that every day 
in the year was a pot of jam. The only 
unoptimistic moments the Barnswallows 
ever have, come when they realize that 
they are not permitted the sight of a 
swallow-tail at their dances. V. 
Kellar closed her welcome by sayirg that 
as it takes more than one swallow to 
make a summer, it takes a great many 
more than one Barnswallow to make a win- 
ter. 

Mis? MacKellar was followed by Dean 
Pendleton, who began by saying that she 
was glad that there was standing room in 
the Barn if no other. Miss MacKellar's 
story reminded Miss Pendleton of another 
little boy who complained that it was al- 
ways "Jam vesterday. jam to-morrow, but 
never jam to-day." In this case, how- 
ever, she said that it was surely jam to- 
night. Miss Pendleton then said that the 



Barnswallows were designed to bring care- 
free enthusiasm to all work at Wellesley. 
The Barn is the one place where we forget 
all academic distinction, whether we have 
been at college one year or twenty. Miss 
Pendleton closed by bidding all a cordial 
welcome to the Barnswallows. 

Miss Davis, following Miss Pendleton, 
said that although the Student Govern- 
ment and the Christian Associations are 
important parts of Wellesley, yet the 
Barnswallow organization is foremost, 
for it is open to all students and is the most 
democratic. Miss Davis spoke of Miss 
MacKellar as a worthy successor of Miss 
Hart. 1904, Miss Knight. 1905. and Miss 
Segar. 1906, and added that most im- 
portant of all she was a fledgling from the 
Xoanett. 

After the addresses, the Wellesley cheer 
was given for the Barnswallows. Mar- 
guerite MacKellar, Dean Pendleton. Miss 
Davis, and 19 10. Those who could find 
room danced in the center, while the less 
venturesome promenaded around the 
outskirts. 



Annual Meeting of the Student 
Government Association. 

The annual meeting of the Wellesley 
Student Government Association was 
held at 4.15. P.M.. Friday. October 5, 1906, 
in College Kail r " ..pel T j« 
presided. 

The meeting opened with prayer by 
Miss Ruth French. President of the 
Christian Association. 

The minutes of the previous meeting 
were read and approved. 

Miss Besse mentioned the facts that the 
seal is an alumnae pin and may not be 
worn by undergraduates until after mid- 
years of their Senior year, and that the 
students of Wellesley College consider it 
a point of honor to give no information 
to any newspaper reporters who are not 
members of the college, but to refer them 
to the proper authorities. The President 
also spoke of the noise in chapel and of 
the reverent attitude which we. as college 
women, should maintain during the 
services in chapel. 

Miss Besse announced that she had re- 
ceived a telegram from Sallie Eustis 
wishing success to the Association and 
promising her loyalty to it. 

The constitution of the Women's In- 
tercollegate Association for Student 
Government was read. 

It was moved that the delegates sent 
to Baltimore be impowered to accept 
this constitution as read. The motion 
was seconded and carried. 

It was moved that the nominations 
for the second representative to the 
Conference at Baltimore be made by ac- 
clamation and one formal ballot be cast. 

The nominations were Misses Betsey 
Baird. Elizabeth Perot. Margaret Ladd 
and Ethel Grant. 

The motion was made, seconded and 
carried that nominations be closed. 

A formal ballot was taken resulting in 
the election of Miss Grant. 

The next business was the election of 
the leader of the Fire Brigade. It was 
moved, seconded and carried that nomina- 



tions be made by acclamation and that 
one formal ballot be cast. The nomina- 
tions were Misses Margaret Ladd, Alice 
Bradt, Gladys Tuttle, Alice Rossington, 
Isabel Simmons, and Gertrude Cate. 

It was moved, seconded and carried 
that nominations be closed. A formal 
ballot was taken resulting in the election 
of Miss Cate. 

After the reading of the agreement 
between the Faculty and students con- 
cerning Student Government, the Con- 
stitution and the By-Laws, Miss Besse 
spoke as follows : — 

In September, 1901. when the first 
Student Government president. Frances 
Hughes made her address before the Associ- 
ation, she said, "It is to be an established 
custom of the Student Government 
Association that its members assemble 
in an annual Fall meeting for the purpose 
of having brought home to them in a very 
real way the obligations of membership." 
It is for that, that we are gathered to- 
gether here to-day. — for the purpose of 
having brought home to us the obligations 
of membership. 

We all know what those obligations 
are, girls. — the obligation to prove our- 
selves individually capable of self-govern- 
ment, and so to maintain together the 
high ideals for which this Association was 
founded. That laws are necessary to the 
life of every body of people, especially 
to the life of a community of 1. 100 is a 
r ivh pr -vperience. That to 

succeed it is absolutely necessary for each 
member to obev the community laws is a 
fact as well established, a fact which we 
should never lose sight of in our college 
life. But our Association should be more 
than this; more than a law making, more 
even than a law keeping body. You 
have just heard the agreement and re- 
member the opening words: "Whereas 
the Students of Wellesley desire to as- 
sume individual and community responsi- 
bility for the conduct of students in their 
college life, and whereas, it is believed 
that such responsibility, if given to the 
students, will make for growth in character 
and power, and will promote loyalty to 
the best interests of the college." It is 
this at which we aim. — growth in character 
and power, and the promotion of loyalty 
to the best interests of the college. 

That our Association not only should 
but does mean this is the experience of 
every girl who has ever worked for and 
in Student Government. It is for this 
that we love the Association, that we 
most gladly pledge our loyalty, our 
strength, all that is in us, for the life of 
Student Government. 

It has been said that this is a critical 
year because of the absence of our Presir 
dent and because now there are no girls 
in college who were here when our own 
government was established. It is criti- 
cal, but that very fact offers a great op- 
portunity. Xow it is our privilege to 
make it. even with its disadvantage 
which will stand out in the history of 
the college as no other year, except per- 
haps 1901, that first year, has stood out. 
To do it we must work together, shoulder 
to shoulder: we must meet the difficulties 
in union and conquer them, confident of 
the unanimous support of the Associa- 
(Continued on page 3) 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College IRews. 

Press of N. A. Lindsey «. Co.. Boston. 



Published weekly. Subscription price, $1.00 a 
year to resident and non-resident. 

All business correspondence should be addressed to 
Miss Myra Kilborn, Business Manager College 

All subscriptions should be sent to Miss Eleanor 
Farrar. 



Editor-in-Chief, Alice W. Farrar, 1908 

Associate Editor, Elizabeth Andrews, 1908 

Literary Editors. 

Leah Curtis, 1908 Estelle E. Littlefield, 1908 

Altjmn-b Editor, 

Lilla Weed. 

Managing Editors, 

Florence Plummer, 1907 Elizabeth Condit, 1907 

Emma McCarrol, 1908 



"Entered as second class matter, November 12. 
1903, at the Post Office, at Wellesley. Mass., under 
the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879." 



For us here at college, New Year's day, 
so far as the making of new resolutions 
is concerned, comes with the reopening of 
classes in October. We look backward 
upon the preceding year and see quite 
clearly where we made our mistakes. In 
looking forward to a whole new year, we 
decide to turn over a "new leaf;" and 
make noble resolutions about the things 
that we will and will not do. Then, with 
these good resolves, we take our plunge 
into the great whirlpool of work and fun 
which make up our "college life." 

When the real New Year comes and 
friends at home are making good resolu- 
tions, we, too, are reminded of our 
own good intentions, and stop to 
think for a moment. Then when mid- 
years have come and gone, and we are 
about to settle down to regular work 
again, we find our second great New 
Year's day at hand. With the memory 
of our recent examinations fresh in mind, 
we resolve once more to reach a better 
standard during the coming half year, 
but with the exception of the slight 
attention we may give to the matter 
at the beginning of the third term, most of 
us work along in about the same dilatory 
way until June. Then, of course, we hurry 
eagerly home with little thought of aca- 



This space reserved for 



LONG, 



41 Summer St., Boston 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE SEAL 
FOBS AND PINS, 

In French Gray and Rose Gold. 

We furnish the Seal Charm with silk fob to 
match, or without. 
Well equipped store to furnish first class 

WEDDING AND HOLIDAY GIFTS. 

Convenient to College. 



demic resolutions. Usually during the sum- 
mer vacation we do not trouble ourselves 
much about the work of the next year — 
provided that our credit cards have 
been fairly satisfactory. October comes 
again, and with it comes the remaking of 
the same old resolutions; for we acknowl- 
edge that we have not succeeded in keep- 
ing them during the year just past much 
better than we did the year before. 
Now this does not apply to every one in 
college, nor it is so much in most important 
matters that we have this failing. It does 
apply, however, to a great many of us in re- 
gard to our resolutions about the many little 
things where the sum total makes such a 
difference. 

As there is no great advantage in making 
new resolutions so easy to keep that we 
would never need to break them, we 
usually find that we have to remake our 
really worth-while resolves. It ought not 
to be necessary, however, to start back 
at the very point from which we began. 
Resolutions regularly made and as regu- 
larly broken; standards — and standards 
not so high as to be unattainable — con- 
tinually set but habitually fallen far short 
of, leave their marks upon our char- 
acters. 

Why is it that we so often fail in carry- 
ing out the good plans which we periodi- 
cally make? Probably the simplest reason 
lies in the fact that it is only periodically 



that we make them and then we cease to 
pay much attention to them. Whatever 
the length of intervening time may be, it 
is natural to feel that new periods in the 
college calendar are times for making 
new resolutions. Now if we are going to 
make any progress, the beginning of a 
new period in the year ought not to be 
the time when we take down our ideals 
from a dusty shelf, glance at them hurried- 
ly, and rush on. It should rather be an 
occasion when we may raise our ideals, be- 
cause, in the season just past, we have 
come near enough to our old standards 
to see something beyond and wish for 
something far better. 

It is not that we have no time to think 
of this matter, but that we do not realize 
the necessity of occasionally taking time 
to think seriously of where we are and 
where we want to be, nor do we perceive 
the yet greater need of spending every 
day and every moment of the day 
in trying our best to reach the desired 
goal. It is only thus that we can save 
ourselves the loss of self respect which 
is sure to come with the habitually broken 
resolution. 



NOTICES. 

Copy for College News should be in 
the hands of the editors by Friday noon 
of each week. It is desirable that all 
communications be written in ink, rather 
than in pencil, and on one side of the 
sheet only. The departments are in 
charge of the following editors: 
General Correspondence. .Alice W. Farrar 

SS C N<!S dar Kabeth Andrews 

Parliament of Fools ) 

Society Notes ^Estelle E. Littlefield 

Music Notes J 

Free Press } 

&£gW Leah T^ Curtis 

Library Notes J 

Alumnae Notes Miss Weed 



Natlclc, Mass. 



Gifts for All 

Occasions. 
J E W E LRY 

For Men and Women. 

If It's New— We Have It. 
Inducements 

are 

QUALITY, 
STYLE 
and PRICE. 




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BOSTON. 



SAVES HOSIERY 



NEVER SLIPS, TEARS 
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The 




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If yc jr Dealer does not sell you this 
Supporter he does not sell ine Best 
Every Clasp has the namu SJBBT* 
Stamped on the Metal Loop*^^ 
GEORGE FROST CO., Makers, Boston. Mass. 




COLLEGE NEWS 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 



Thursday, October n, at 7.30 P.M. Regular mid-week 
prayer meeting of the Christian Association. 

Sunday, October 14, at n A.M., services in Houghton Memo- 
rial Chapel. Sermon by Dean Hodges of the Episcopal 
Theological School of Cambridge. 
7 P.M., vespers with special music. 



COLLEGE NOTES. 

The first meeting of the Running Club was held October 2 
The club had its first regular call-out on Wednesday afternoon, 
October 3. 1 908 turned out a full squad, and 1909, although 
crippled by the non-return of two of its members, made up in 
enthusiasm what it lacked in numbers. 

Miss Florence Besse, President of the Student Government 
Association, Miss Olive Smith, Vice-President of the Student 
Government Association, and Miss Roma Nickerson, Vice- 
President of the Christian Association, addressed the new stu- 
dents on Wednesday afternoon, October 3, in College Hall 
Chapel. 

On Wednesday evening, October 3, the Sophomore Class 
gave the usual serenade to the Freshmen. The long line of 
girls in white with their gay Japanese lanterns was very effective. 
The first regular mid-week prayer meeting of the Wellesley 
College Christian Association was held in College Hall Chapel 
on Thursday evening, October 4. Miss Pendleton, the speaker 
of the evening, took for her text the eighth verse of the third 
chapter of Revelations — "Behold, I have set before thee an 
open door and no man can shut it." To this was added the 
verse from John X of the Good Shepherd and the sheep. These 
verses, the best guides for the opening of the college year, show 
the new opportunity which each year brings to us, whether for 
the first time here, or not. This door, open to each one, no one 
can close even through misuse or disuse. The figure of Christ, 
Himself the door, is very simple to comprehend, and hard to 
withstand. Though the opening may lead to failure, we yet 
gain knowledge, though it may lead to sorrow, it yet teaches love 
and life, and always brings opportunity for development and 
service. If we enter, with Christ as guide, we shall always find 
a promise of more abundant life, supported by the Faith in 
Christ. 

The Seniors, in cap and gowns, gathered on the South Porch 
of College Hall at half-past nine on Thursday evening, October 
4, to serenade their President, Miss Gladys Doten, in honor of 
her birthday. 

Mr. Harry Wade Hicks, an officer of the Young People's 
Missionary Union of Greater Boston, gave an address upon 
"Bible and Mission Study" in Billings Hall, at 4 o'clock, on 
Sunday afternoon, October 7. Mr. Hicks is well known to the 
college students who attended the Silver Bay conference. 

Miss Laura Townsend, formerly of 1908, is teaching school 
in El Paso, Texas. 

At vespers on Sunday evening, October 7, an address was 
made by Mr. John W. Wood, secretary of the Episcopal Mission 
Board. The subject was, "The Call of Present Opportunity." 
Miss Mary T. Noss, 1909, is studying in Paris this winter. 
She will return to Wellesley next year to complete her college 
course. Her address is, care of Mme. de Kerilly, 63 Boulevard 
St. Michel, Paris. 

On Thursday evening October ,11, the prayer meeting of the 
Christian Association will be led by Miss Ruth French. The 
subject is "The Lordship of Jesus Christ." Everyone is cor- 
dially invited to be present. 

Several members of the Department of French have re- 
turned from a summer abroad and all report delightful expe- 
riences and pleasant weather throughout. 

Associate Professor Colin sailed on the North German Lloyd, 
Konig Albert, landed at Gibraltar and did Spain alone and en- 



Boston and flaine Railroad 

Lowest Rates. Fast Train Service between Boston and Chicago, St. Louis, 
St. Paul, Minneapolis and all points West, Northwest and Southwest. 

Pullman Palace or Sleeping Cars on all through lines. For tickets and 
information apply at any principal ticket office of the Company. 

D. J. FLANDERS, Gen'l. Pass, and Tkt. Agt., Boston. 



thusiastically. She then proceeded thence through southern and 
western France to Paris where she was privileged to enjoy the 
company of near kinsmen. 

Mile. Puthod spent most of her time in her home in Paris 
as did Mile. Cannes who further took an extensive European 
trip; Miss Todd comes to us after a long period of study abroad. 

All the members of the Department are in excellent health, 
the best of spirits and ready to enter energetically into their 
work. 

Miss Agnes Rothery has been elected Sophomore Editor of 
College News. 

THE WELLESLEY ORCHESTRA. 



Dear College News: 

Freshmen and new students will be interested to know that 
we are now starting an orchestra for Wellesley College. The 
responses to a letter written last year were instant and gratify- 
ing. We have already applications from several violins, a 'cello 
and (mirabile dictu!) a double bass. Will not some student 
volunteer to learn the cornet or clarinet or flute for Alma Mater? 
We at Music Hall will gladly furnish rooms for practice. Can 
any student at Wellesley give us one satisfactory reason why 
Vassar and Smith should have large and fine orchestras, and 
Wellesley none? Mr. Foster, Room 13, Music Hall, the Direct- 
or, will be glad to confer with all interested. 

Yours for progress, 
H. C. Macdougall. 

RESOLUTION OF THE SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



At a meeting of the Class of 1909, held Thursday, October 4, 
the following resolution was adopted: 

Whereas — The college at large is opposed to any further 
demonstration between the Freshmen and Sophomore Classes: 

And whereas — Such demonstration is considered detri- 
mental to the dignity of the college, 

Be it resolved — That we, the Class of 1909, disapprove of 
any further disturbance of this nature, and 

Be it resolved — That the Class of 1909 refuses to take part 
in any interference with the affairs of the Freshmen Class, and 

Be it further resolved — That a copy of this resolution be 
published in the College News. 

Signed. Amy M. Brown, 

President of 1909. 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Annual Meeting of the Student Government 
Association. 



tion. It may be hard, but it can and it must be done. 

We must make it a year of real self government, a year 
in which every day brings something more of loyalty and 
power to each girl, something more of effectiveness and 
success to the Association, a year of actual life and growth, 
such that at the end, when the classes from 1901 to 1906 
come back they shall find that we have been worthy of our 
heritage, that we have in all things maintained the highest 
ideals of Student Government and of Wellesley. 

As there was no further business to come before the meet- 
ing, it was moved that the meeting adjourn. The motion 
was seconded and carried. 

The meeting adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ethel V. Grant, Secretary. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



[FRESHMAN 


DIRECTC 


>RY. 

Noanett 


HOLDEN'S 

20 North Avenue 


STU 


DIO, 


Abbott, Margaret H. 




NaticR, 


Adair, Helen M. 
Adams, Margery F. 




8 Waban street 
Xoanett 


High Grade 


Portraits, 


Adamson, Mary 
Anden, Ethel Leona 




6 Midland 










18 Belair 
Webb 


CONNECTED BY 


TELEPHONE. 


Anderson, Dora C. 








Atkinson, Mary E. 




32 Dover street 


David, Erma M. 




3 Waban street 


At wood, Alice L. 




2 Waban street 


Day, Florence 




18 Belair avenue 


Babbitt, Ina F. 




8 Waban street 


Dearborn, Alice W. 




17 Cottage street 


Ball, Marion Helena 


628 


Washington street 


Decker, Blanche 




7 Waban street 


Bardons, Helen C. 




3 Waban street 


De Long, Miriam E. 




3 Waban street 


Barrow, Betty P. 


628 


Washington street 


Dempster, Gladys 






Bates, Mary 




7 Waban street 


Dey, Dorothy 




W. Newton 


Bates, Mila G. 




2 Waban street 


Dieterich, Daphne Dane 




Wellesley Hills 


Bell, Emily E. 






Douglas, Isadore 




8 Waban street 


Bennett, Helen F. 




Noanett 


Dow, Esther H. 




1 1 Waban street 


Bennett, Imogene 






Downes, Minnetta M. 




7 Waban street 


Bentley, Marguerite 




Noanett 


Drumm, Edith J. 




6 Cross street 


Bergengren, Rena C. 




3 Norfolk terrace 


Dunbaugh, Ruth J. 


603 


Washington street 


Binney, Dorothy 




2 Waban street 


Eames, Stella W. 




Webb 


Blacker, Ruth L. 




Noanett 


Eaton, Alice M. 




12 Abbott street 


Blish, Elizabeth 


629 Washington street 


Edgerly, Margaret W. 




12 Abbott street 


Blodgett, Harriet R. 




Noanett 


Egelston, Elizabeth R. 




Noanett 


Bonning, Irma R. 




Noanett 


Elliott, Ruth 




Webb 


Bowen, Beulah I. 




32 Dover street 


Elliott, Tudis L. 




3 Waban street 


Bridgman, Dorothy D. 


629 


Washington street 


Ellis, Gertrude 


629 


Washington street 


Bristol, Louise F. 




15 Belair avenue 


Ellmaker, Lucy H. 


629 


Washington street 


Britts, Hazel 




7 Waban street 


Everett, Marion B. 




12 Abbott street 


Brooks, Stella M. 




20 Cottage street 


Felix, Gertrude L. 




Webb 


Brown, Augusta 




Noanett 


Fenno, Cornelia A. 


603 


Washington street 


Brown, Lois S. 




6 Abbott street 


Filley, Helen J. 




10 Blossom street 


Bubier, Margaret E. 




3 Norfolk terrace 


Fletcher, Ruth B. 




15 Cottage street 


Bufnngton, Mary M. 




7 Cottage street 


Foote, Edna A. 


629 


Washington street 


Bulkley, Helen 




8 Waban street 


Fowler, Eloise I. 




1 5 Abbott street 


Bullock, Ruth 




Webb 


Frame, Leslie C. 




16 Blossom street 


Burnett, Elizabeth R. 




8 Waban street 


Freeman, Helen E. 




17 Cottage street 


Burr, Helen 




Webb 


French, Jessie G. 




18 Belair avenue 


Camp, Nellie E. 




3 Waban street 


Fritz, Mary M. 




18 Belair avenue 


Carey, Alice 




Newtonville 


Frost, Mildred M. 




Newtonville 


Carpenter, Meriam B. 




Noanett 


Fulton, Ellen M. 




8 Waban street 


Carter, Gertrude M. 




1 Waban street 


Gifford, Margaret A. 




26 Blossom street 


Castle, Ina 




3 Norfolk terrace 


Gilmore, Anna 




Noanett 


Chase, Harriet N. 




21 Cottage street 


Gooding, Lora 




16 Abbott street 


Chase, Nellie 




6 Midland avenue 


Goodrich, Margaret E. 




26 Blossom street 


Church, Clare L. 




3 Norfolk terrace 


Gowen, Louise C. 




Noanett 


Churchill, Mary E. 




7 Waban street 


Greene, Mae 




Webb 


Clark, Daisy 




Waltham 


Gregory, Henrietta 




21 Cottage street 


Clark, Lucile E. 




12 Abbott street 


Grenier, G. A. 




Newton Highlands 


Clark, Mildred 




8 Waban street 


Guild, Dorothy B. 




Webb 


Clarke, Olive M. 




15 Cottage street 


Haines, Geraldine R. 




7 Cottage street 


Clemence, Bertha L. 


609 Washington street 


Hall, Helen E. 






Cochrane, Margaret R. 




Noanett 


Hall, Mary E. 




3 Waban street 


Coffin, S. Frances 




15 Belair avenue 


Haller, Freda 




9 Abbott 


Collett, Mary E. 




Noanett 


Harper, Gretchen 




8 Waban 


Collins, Julia N. 




18 Belair avenue 


Hatch, Mayde B. 




Webb 


Conley, Helen A. 






Hawkridge, Emrna L. 




Noanett 


Conant, Persis L. 




Noanett 


Hazeltine, Dorothy M. 




26 Blossom street 


Conlon, Sadie 




7 Waban street 


Heiser, Irene 




Noanett 


Cook, Alice C. 




Noanett 


Henderson, Ruth 




8 Belair avenue 


Cook, Lucy E. 




32 Dover street 


Hendrie, Grace E. 




8 Waban street 


Cook, Mary E. 






Hersey, Hannah H. 




Noanett 


Cooke, Guenn 




12 Cottage street 


Hill, Alice L. 




12 Norfolk terrace 


Corwin, Iva M. 




12 Norfolk terrace 


Hinchliff, Harriet E. 




Noanett 


Cottrell, Bertha T. 




Noanett 


Hoag, Helen 


603 Washington street 


Cramer, Ettamae 




3 Waban street 


Hodgman, Genevieve 




25 Blossom street 


Croasdale, Helen 




15 Belair avenue 


Holbrook, Grace A. 




18 Church street 


Curry, Flora G. 


641 


Washington street 


Holderbaum, Ethel M. 




5 Abbott street 


Curtis, Josephine 


629 


Washington street 


Home, Eleanor T. 




Framingham 


Cushman, Kate E. 




Noanett 


Howard, Dorothy 




6 Midland avenue 


Dalzell, Mary Louise 


628 


Washington street 


(Continued on 


Page 5.) 





COLLEGE NEWS 



(Continued from Page 4.) 

FRESHMAN DIRECTORY.— Continued. 



Howlett, Marion 
Hungerford, C. H. 
Hunter, Anita D. 
Hunter, Hazel V. 
Hunting, Helen S. 
Huntington, Vere L. 
Hutchinson, Ethyl W. 
Iddings, Justine L. 
Irwin, Alice M. 
Jamieson, Elsie I. 
Jeffs, Eva S. 
Jellerson, Marjorie D. 
Johnson, Enid B. 
Johnson, Esther C. 
Johnson, Katharine L. 
Johnson, Ruth 
Johnston, Marietta E. 
Johonnot, Martha M. 
Jones, Helen G. 
Kast, Virginia L. 
Kasten, Marie L. 
Keller, Kate C. 
Kelly, Frances H. 
Kelly, Imogene R. 
Kent, Anna S. 
Kilborne, Grace A. 
Knowles, Alice M. 
Kraft, Genevieve C. 
Lane, Dorothy Q. 
Larimore, Harriet T. 
Larimore, Louise D. 
Leland, Edna L. 
Leonard, Miriam 
Lester, Ruth 
Libby, Mary W. 
Lipe, Marjorie S. 
Loder, Miriam Y. 
Loos, Fanny H. 
Lorenz, Nancy L. 
Loucks, Ruth 
Love, Kathleen L. 
McClellan, Bessie L. 
MacDonald, Florence S. 
Macdonald, Helen 
McDonald, Grace 
McDuffee, Jennie M. 
McGill, Katharine C. 
MacKinlay, Marion W. 
McKinney, Lois 
McKnight, Mary K. 
Mallory, Florence R. 
Mann, Agnes L. 
Mapes, Belle 
Marshall, Sara E. 
Mason, Clara R. 
Mason. Marion A. 
Mayo, Carrie L. 
Mayer, L. S. 
Mead, Rina L. 
Mead, Helen M. 
Merridith, Marjorie 
Messer, Florence V. 
Midwood, Edith E. 
Millar, Eva M. 
Mills, Marion P. 
Moffatt, Sara L 
Moore, Cora D. 
Moore, Eleanor 
Moore, Vera A. 



2 Waban street 

Milford 

628 Washington street 

628 Washington street 

20 Cottage street 

8 Waban street 

6 Abbott street 

38 Dover street 

8 Abbott street 

603 Washington street 

603 Washington street 

6 Cross street 

Noanett 

16 Blossom street 

629 Washington street 



Noanett 

1 1 Waban street 

7 Cottage street 

629 Washington street 

Noanett 

3 Norfolk terrace 

Noanett 

26 Blossom street 

25 Blossom street 

628 Washington street 

32 Dover street 

603 Washington street 

6oq Washington street 

Noanett 

Xoanett 

14 Dover street 

Webb 

1 5 Belair avenue 

Noanett 

6 Midland avenue 

12 Norfolk terrace 

9 Abbott street 

9 Abbott street 

1 5 Cottage street 

5 Abbott street 

2 Waban street 

609 Washington street 

(104 Washington street 

Noanett 

629 Washington street 

Webb 

Noanett 

18 Belair avenue 

25 Blossom street 

Noanett 

Noanett 

12 Cottage street 

7 Cottage street 

7 Cottage street 
15 Belair avenue 
18 Belair avenue 

Webb 

Noanett 

Noanett 

6 Cross street 

8 Belair avenue 
61 Central street 
14 Abbott street 



Morey, Helen A. 
Moritz, Mildred A., 
Morrill, May E., 
Morrison, Mary G. 
Morton, Alice F., 
Mesenfelder, Jeanette 
Mose, Edith L., 
Mossman, Lois 
Mowrey, Frances L., 
Mueller, Adele E., 
Muirhead, Minnie S., 
Muller, Maud S., 
Munyan, Helen W.. 
Murphy, Helen 
Murphy, Margaret 
Neely, Jessie L. 
Nevin, Dorothy 
Nofsinger, Elizabeth 
Oak, Gertrude E. 
Orr, Louise 
Otis, Annie M. 
Otis, Mildred E. 
Park, Esther M, 
Paterson, Sarah R. 
! Patten, Alice O. 
Patterson, Eleanor R. 
Pattison, Emma C. 
Perry, C. M. 
Perry, Eleanor F. 
Phillipps, Louise B. 
Piatt, Helen R. 
Platts, Catharine N. 
Porter, Alice R. 
Powell, Emily H. 
Prescott, Ethel B. 
Proctor, Edith W. 
Rabbitts, Frances 
Randall, Esther N. 
Rattle, Elspeth M. 
Rebstock, Helen E. 
Rhein, Ernestine 
Rhoades, Ethel Viola 
Rhodes, Hazel 
Richardson, Dorothy 
Robertson, Ruth 
Robinson, Elizabeth 
Rogers, Lillian A. 
Roth, Alice M. 
Rowbotham, Margaret V. 
Rowell, Marjorie 
Rowell, Rena 
Rowley, Helen 
Ruddiman, Louise A. 
Rue, Roberta 
Russell, Hilda F. 
Russell, Ruth 
Salthouse, Elsie A. 
Sanger, Harriette 
Sapinsky, Ruth 
Schermerhorn, Gertrude 
Schmidt, Marie L. 
Scott, Katharine J. 
Scott, Ruth B. 
Seasongood, Elsie 
Shaw, Alice A. 
Shaw, Alta M. 
Shaw. Margaret G. 
Simons, Ella I. 
Simrall, Elizabeth L. 

(Concluded on 



Webb 

609 Washington street 

9 Abbott street 

8 Waban street 

8 Waban street 

17 Cottage street 
604 Washington street 

18 Church street 
603 Washington street 

18 Belair avenue 

7 Waban street 

9 Abbott street 

Webb 

Webb 

1 Waban street 

9 Cottage street 
6 Cross street 

8 Waban street 
628 Washington ,treet 

N oanett 

609 Washington street 

17 Cottage street 

6 Midland avenue 

25 Blossom street 

26 Blossom street 
8 Belair avenue 

Natick 

Upland road 

Webb 

Noanett 

10 Abbott street 

Noanett 

7 Waban street 
15 Belair avenue 

14 Dover street 

24 Church street 

Webb 

32 Dover street 

17 Cottage street 
24 Church street 

Noanett 

8 Waban street 

7 Cottage street 

24 Church street 

Noanett 

628 Washington street 

15 Belair avenue 

8 Abbott street 

9 Abbott street 

18 Belair avenue 
15 Abbott street 

1 1 Waban street 

Webb 

44 Dover street 

18 Belair avenue 

3 Waban street 

8 Waban street 

9 Abbott street 
15 Belair avenue 

Upland road 

21 Cottage street 

Noanett 

18 Belair avenue 

7 Waban street 

38 Dover street 

15 Belair avenue 

628 Washington street 

Page 6.) 



COLLEGE NEWS 



EDWARD RAKAS (Si SONS, 

High Grade Furs, 

364 Boylston Street, 

Special Discount to Students. 



lowwtys 



CHOCOLATES 

SOc and 60c per lb. 
DELICIOUS -DAINTY— PURE. 
416 Washington St., (4th door North of Summer St.) 



H. L. FLAGG, 

Daily Papers, Periodicals, 

Stationery, Etc. 

WRIGHT & DITSON SPORTING GOODS. 

Waban Block, Wellesley Sq. 

R. DIEHL, JR., 

Livery and Boarding Stable, 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 

Bagrage Transferred to and from 
Statio Meet all trains. Orders 

promp,' attended to. Hacks for 
Funeral and Parties. 

Telephone No. 16-2. 

Pianos for Rent. 

SPECIALTY: A small piano with 
a big tone. This piano is used 
extensively by Yale students. 

DERBY'S PIANO ROOMS, 

Clark's Block, - - Natick 

G. L. ABELL, PHOTOGRAPHER, 

Wellesley Square, Wellesley, Mass. 

Art Pictures. Metal Frames. Framing, Photo Mailers. 

DEVELOPING AND PRINTING FOR AMATEURS. 

Teco Pottery. Plaster Casts. Cottage Seals. 

Telephone. WFUFSIEY SOUVENIR POSTAIS. 



TURNER CENTER DAIRYING 
ASSOCIATION,^* 

33 Pulton Street, Cor. Cross, 

BOSTON 

Telephone, 207 Richmond. 

This space reserved for | 

The Wellesley Grocery. 

E. P. PARKER, 

Boots and Shoes 

THE NORMAN, 

Wellesley Square, Wellesley, Mass. 



Ward, Emilie M. 
Waterhouse, Margaret 
Webster, Ethel D. 
Welch, Grace 
West, Elsie 
Wharton, Jessie 
Whitaker, Louise 
White, Agnes 
Wilber, Margaret H. 
Wilbor, Katharine S. 
Wilcox, Ruth S. 
Wilde, Edith 
Williams, Anne J. 



(Continued from Page 5.) 

FRESHMAN DIRECTORY— Continued. 



Skinner, Inez T. 
Smith, Selma F. 
Snook, Jewett 
Snyder, Elizabeth H. 
Snyder, Marjorie A. 
Snyder, Mary F. 
Souder, B. Frances 
Spahr, Winifred U. 
Spaide, Hazel 
Spalding, Caroline 
Sperry, Ruth S. 
Stallknecht, Marguerete L. 
Stayer, Clara M. 
Stephens, Bertha 
Stevens, Florence 
Stewart, Florence M. 
Strecker, Elizabeth F. 
Stretton, Marian S. 
Swackhamer, Margaret E. 
Swain, Agnes 
Symonds, Maud L. 
Taussig, Dorothy 
Taussig, Edith E. 
Taylor, Evelyn M. 
Taylor, Mabel A. 
Taylor, Nathalie V. 
Thomas, Clara B. 
Thompson, Elizabeth K. 
Tilton, Hannah M. 
Todd, Susan M. 
Tredwell, Katharine E. 
Troy, Mabelle Agnes 
Tucker, Mary Morrow 
Tully, Mattie L. 
Tute, Helen B. 
Twining, Jessie W. 
Urlin, Marguerite 
Vail, Jeannette 
Van Saut, Katharine R. 
Van Valkenburgh, Edna 
Vissman, Dorothy 
Vose, Caroline E. 
Wadsworth, Alice F. 
Wahl, M. Rita 
Walker, Carlena 
Walker, Mary B. 
Wallis, Helen A. 
Ward, Annah S. 

17 Waban street 

628 Washington street 

Webb 

3 Waban street 

22 Cottage street 

38 Dover street 

629 Washington street 
26 Blossom street 

Noanett 
8 Belair avenue 

Cochituate 



3 Waban street 

Noanett 

8 Abbott street 

1 Waban street 

629 Washington street 

Noanett 

8 Belair avenue 
6 Abbott street 
Noanett 
12 Abbott street 
8 Abbott street 



9 Abbott street 

8 Waban street 
32 Dover street 

17 Cottage street 

14 Dover street 
Noanett 
Noanett 

9 Abbott street 

9 Cottage street 

Noanett 
Noanett 
Noanett 
Noanett 

10 Abbott street 

18 Blossom street 

22 Cottage street 

15 Cottage street 

17 Cottage street 

629 Washington street 

Noanett 

7 Waban street 

18 Church street 

18 Church street 

Noanett 

7 Waban street 

609 Washington street 

22 Cottage street 
3 Norfolk terrace 

Williams, Bernice 

Williams, Helene 

W T illiams, Marguerite F. 

Wilson, Carolyn A. 

Wilson, Ruth E. 

Wilson, Ruth N. 

Winslow, Jane P. 

Wiss, Florence S. 

Wolff, Jessie G. 

Wyatt, Florence E. 

Young, Eleanor M. 

Youngman, Amanda L. 



J. TAILBY (Sb SON, 

FLORISTS, 

Wellesley, Opp. Railroad Station, 

Orders by mail or otherwise promptly attended to. 
Connected by Telephone. 

John A. Morgan & Co. 
PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, 
WELLESLEY. 



BUY THE BEST 




CHOCOLATES. 

"The Taste Tells." 

F. A. COOLIDGE & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

Choice Meats and Provisions, 

Washington St., Wellesley. 



F. H. PORTER, 

Plumbing and Heating. 

Hardware, Skates and Hock- 
eys, Curtain Rods and Fixtures, 
Cutlery and Fancy Hardware, 
Kitchen Furnishings for the 
Club Houses. 




Noanett 

i 5 Abbott street 
3 Norfolk terrace 
22 Cottage street 
1 8 Blossom street 
7 Waban street 
15 Cottage street 
1 1 Waban street 

Noanett 

3 Waban street 

628 Washington street 



COLLEGE NEWS 



FREE PRESS. 



I. 

During the two years and some odd months that the writer 
has spent at college, there has been a gradual change in the 
attitude of the students as a whole toward Student Govern- 
ment. This change is not very great, nor as yet, very alarming, 
but there are straws winch show the direction of the wind. 
That the students are still loyal and faithful to Student Govern- 
ment there is no doubt, but that they are not absolutely satis- 
lied with everything in Student Government is suggested to 
anybody who has heard — as I think most of us have, — criti- 
cisms regarding certain minor rules. I have never heard a 
word against Student Government, nor do I think such a thing 
would be possible — but minor criticism of what pertains to 
Student Government is rather prevalent and will in the end 
bring it harm 

In trying to trace the causes of such dissatisfaction, I found, 
by following up these derogatory remarks with questions, that 
in every ease they were the result of a rule being applied to fit 
the letter of the law and not the spirit. Now all fair minded 
students realize the difficulties with which proctors and heads 
of houses have to contend. They realize also that the girls 
who are in such offices are trying conscientiously to fulfill their 
duties toward the students and the Student Government Asso- 
ciation. It is a fact of which to be proud that the enforcement 
■ of rules here entails almost no personal feeling on either side. 
However, for this very reason the blame and the responsibility 
is shifted back to Student Government. To take a well-known 
example, a girl is "called up" for neglecting to put P.M. after 
her departure at 1.07. She may be careful to record the P.M. 
upon all occasions when there would be danger of ambiguity: 
the head of the house may understand this, but because some- 
time there might be a similar mistake which could not be so 
readily explained, the rules compel the head of the house to 
notice the omission. I can remember of being "called up," 
one February or March for putting the wrong year upon my 
slip. I believe that many a girl, however loyal she may be to 
Student Government, cherishes the memory of some similar 
offence. 

On the other hand, the argument of Student Government is 
both sane and reasonable : in so large a body, to make an ex- 
ception to a rule is to establish a difficult precedent ; the students 
make the rules; the students, therefore, should respect them. 
Now, in fact, the students do respect the rules. I believe that 
the objections made are due to the interpretations of the rules; 
and that this dissatisfaction is not given formal voice because 
such matters are too small and insignificant in themselves to be 
brought up in a Student Government meeting. The situation 
stands thus : there is a certain amount of complaint on common 
sense grounds against a too literal interpretation of Student 
Government rules. This dissatisfaction finds an outlet 
merely in idle talk, — talk that indirectly is doing the student 
organization harm. 

Now for the good of Student Government we all agree that 
a strict maintenance of the rules is necessary. Therefore, 
let us keep these rules, let us suppress grumbling over trivial 
matters, and, if there is dissatisfaction over things of real im- 
portance, let us bring it openly before the public. 



CROSS COUNTRY WALKING CLUB. 



The Cross Crountry Walking Club invites everyone interested 
in walking to try their long Monday walks, which began October 
8. The time and place of meeting, with information as to the 
proposed walk, will be posted each week on the class boards. 
There is absolutely no red tape. Just walk enough each week 
to keep in condition and then come out for a good time on 
Monday. Don't miss the walks this beautiful fall weather. 

A. L. C. 



A PEEK AT OUR 



LADIES' HATS AND FURS 

Will convince you that we have what you want. 

HALL & HANCOCK CO., 420 Washington Street, Boston. 



MISSIONARY GIFTS FOR 1905=06. 



A number of girls have expressed a desire to know to what 
objects the Missionary Committee distributed the money 
pledged last year by members of the college for the support of 
missions, both at home and abroad. In answer to this most 
reasonable request, the following statement is printed: 

WORK IN AHMEDNAGAR, INDIA. 

To Doctor Ruth Hume, salary, etc $858.33 

" support of an orphan in Ahmednagar 27.00 

" Elizabeth Hume Hunsberger 5x0 

OTHER FOREIGN WORK. 

To Constantinople College 50.00 

" Mitsu Okada for Y. W. C. A. building in Tokio. . 25.00 

" famine suffers in Japan 20.75 

" Doctor Grenfell of Labrador 25.00 

" Mrs. Mills' School for Deaf in China 2S00 

" McAll Mission in France 1500 

WORK IN THE UNITED STATES. 

To Dinah Pace's Negro School, Georgia 100.00 

Miss Wilkins' Negro School, Alabama 25.00 

Indian Schools in Nebraska 100.00 

a settlement in the Kentucky Mountains 105.00 

the American International School, Springfield. .. . 50.00 
the support of a Mexican child in New Mexico... 10.00 



MUSIC NOTES. 



In Billings Hall every Wednesday preceding a Symphony 
Concert, from 4.20 to 5.00 and beginning October 10, Mr. Mac- 
dougall will play as much of the program of the following con- 
cert as practicable; he will be assisted from time to time by oth- 
er members of the department. Whenever it seems helpful an 
analysis of the music will be given, with biographical or other 
interesting details. 

These Symphony Programs are prepared for the college at 
large and all are cordially invited. 

The regular series of recitals by students in the Music De- 
partment will begin as soon as the outdoor athletic season is 
over. The recitals will be given on Tuesday afternoons (in- 
stead of Wednesdays, as last year) at 4.20 in Billings Hall. 
Every member of the college is cordially invited to attend. 



Officers of Student ^Government Association. 

President Florence F. 

Vice-president Olive Smith 

Secretary Ethel V. Grant 

Treasurer Betsey Baird 

Senior Member Margaret Noyes 

Junior Member Elizabeth Perot 

Sophomore Member Margaret Kennedy 

Office Hours. 
President: Thursday, 11. 30-12. 30, P.M. 
Friday, 2.30- 3.00, P.M. 

Vice-president: Thursday, 9.55-10.50, A.M. 

Friday, 10. 50-11. 35, A.M. 

Saturday, 10. 50-11. 35, A.M. 



COLLEGE N E WS 



ALUMNA NOTES. 

This column will contain items concerning] Alumnae, former 
students, and past and present members of the' Faculty. Other 
items will occasionally be added which are thought to be of es- 
pecial interest to the readers of the Alumna? Notes. 

The College Club, 40 Commonwealth avenue, Boston, an- 
nounces, in its calendar for October, two afternoons of especial 
interest. On October 13, Professor Hugo Munsterberg will 
read a paper entitled "The Mission of English," and on October 
27, Dr. C. Hanford Henderson will speak on "Education Re- 
viewed." 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the "Wellesley 
Tea Room" was held October 1. The report showed that the 
Inn has had a successful year. Miss Louise Just, the dieti- 
cian for the Inn, is to spend the year abroad. Miss Alice 
Rowe, 1900, has taken a place on the official staff of the Inn. 

Miss Mabel A. Chase, Instructor in Physics in Wellesley 
College, 1890-1891 and 1893-1897, is promoted to the rank of 
Associate Professor in Physics in Mt. Holyoke College. 

Mrs. Winifred Edgerton Merrill, 1883, announces the open- 
ing of "Oaksmere," a school for girls, at Davenport's Neck, 
New Rochelle, New York. 

Mrs. Mary Dransfield Allis, 1890, has spent the summer 
abroad. 

Miss Katharine Quint, 1890, will teach this year in the Wom- 
an's College of Baltimore, as a substitute for Miss Lila V. 
North, 1881-1883, who is on leave of absence. 

Miss Sarah Jane Freeman, 1891, and Miss Mary A. Davis, 
1896, are conducting the Kenjockety Bindery, 1230 Amster- 
dam avenue, New York City. 

Miss Mary E. Holmes, 1892, Associate Professor of Chemis- 
try in Mount Holyoke College, is on leave of absence for the 
present year. 

Dr. Roxana H. Vivian, 1894, sailed for Constantinople on 
August 25, to take up her work in the American College for 
Girls. Dr. Vivian stopped at Gibraltar, Naples, Athens, and 
Smyrna. The voyage was an unusually pleasant one. 

Miss Theresa L. Huntington, 1896, has resigned her posi- 
tion as missionary of the American Board in Harpoot, Turkey. 

Miss Grace E. Bird, 1893-96, conducted, this summer, a 
camp for girls on Lake Stimson, in the White Mountains. Her 
permanent address is Plymouth, New Hampshire. 

Miss Florence Breed, 1899, is to study this winter at Union 
Theological Seminary, New York City. 

Miss Frances H. Rousmaniere, 1900, who last June received 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Radcliffe College, has 
accepted a position in the Department of Mathematics at Mount 
Holyoke College. 

Miss Margaret Mills, 1901, has spent the summer in Europe. 

Miss Helen R. Norton, 1905, has returned for a second year 
as secretary of Miss Haskell's School, 314 Marlborough street, 
Boston. 

The following positions to teach have been accepted for 
1906-07: 

Miss Mabel Butman, 1887, and Miss A. Laura Batt, 1891, are 
teaching in the English High School, Somerville, Massachu- 
setts. 

Miss Elizabeth F. Abbe, 1888, is teaching in the Melrose, 
(Massachusetts), High School. 

Miss Jennette A. Moulton, 1894, and Miss Cora W. Rogers, 
1898, are teaching in the Newton, (Massachusetts), High School. 
Miss Josephine D. Brooks, 1895, is to teach in the High 
School of Montclair, New Jersey. 

Miss Beatrice Stepanek, 1895, is teaching Latin in the East- 
ern District High School, Brooklyn, New York. 

Miss Lillian E. Schaller, 1898, is teaching French and Ger- 
man in theJHigh School at Wallingford, Connecticut. 

Miss Caroline M. Locke, 1900, is to teach in the High School 
of Mount Vernon, New York. 

Miss Martha Voorhes, 1903, is to teach in Baldwinsville, New 
York. 



This space reserved for A. Shuman 



Miss Alice D. Chapman, 1904, is to be teacher of English, 
History, and Latin at Bay Shore, Long Island. 

Miss Ethel I. Moody, 1904, is teaching in the ninth grade 
of the Wilson School, Natick, Massachusetts. 

Miss E. F. Reed, 1905, is to teach in the High School of 
North Plainfield, New Jersey. 

Miss Emelie Goodale, 1906, is to teach at Bourne, Massachu- 
setts. 

Miss Mary E. Moulton, 1906, has been appointed teacher in 
the High School of Gloucester, Massachusetts. 

Miss Elizabeth Nickelson, 1906, is teaching Latin at the 
College Preparatory School, Atchinson, Kansas. 

Miss Gertrude Seibert, 1906, is to teach in Tillotson College, 
Austin, Texas. 

Miss Catharine C. Whitaker, 1906, is teaching at the Frank- 
lin, (New Hampshire), High School. 

Miss Helen L. White, 1906, is teacher of French and Latin 
at Rockville, Connecticut. 

Miss Bertha Eckert, formerly of 1907, is to teach at Bolton, 
Massachusetts. 

Notice has been received of the following changes in address: 

Dr. Marion Marsh, 1880, 295 Woodman avenue, Buffalo, 
Xew York. 

Miss Grace Marsh, 1885, 5607 Washington avenue, Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Miss Florence Marsh, 1892, 378 Wabash avenue, Chicago, 
Illinois, care Henry Holt & Co. 

Mrs. Grace Rickey Linn, 1893, St. Johns, Province of Que- 
bec. 

Mrs. Mabel Johnson Smith, formerly of 1893, East Somer- 
ville, Massachusetts. 

Mrs. Emily Wooster Mohr, 1898-99, 93 Lenox avenue, East 
Orange, New Jersey. 

Miss Marion Stansfield, 1905, 126 West 82d street, Xew York 
City. 

ENGAGEMENTS. 

Miss Lurena L. Wilson, 1903, to Mr. Walter Sheldon Tower, 
of the University of Pennsylvania. 

MARRIAGES. 

Ripley — Carlisle. In New Haven, Connecticut, July 11, 
1906, Miss Ellor E. Carlisle, formerly Associate Professor of 
Pedagogy, to Mr. Fred L. Ripley. 

Getz— Ellingwood. In Providence, Rhode Island, June 
27, 1906, Miss Edith Maud Ellingwood, formerly of 1900, to 
Mr. William Hubbell Getz. At home, 60 Friendship street, 
Providence, Rhode Island. 

Clark — White. At Sioux Rapids, Iowa, September 25, 
1906, Miss Effie Alene White, 1903, to Mr. Lewis Harold Clark. 
At home, 509 Walnut street, Rockford, Illinois. 

Hazard — Stetson. In Los Angeles, California, August 
7, 1906, Miss Florence Taylor Stetson, formerly of 1909, to Mr. 
George Emmott Hazard. At home, 1240 West Twenty-ninth 
street. 

DEATHS. 

In Waltham, Massachusetts, July 17, 1906, Rev. George A. 
Bowman, father of Mrs. Caroline Bowman Parkinson, 1880. 

In Melrose, Massachusetts, August 2, 1906, Mrs. Abby Shep- 
ard Burr, mother of Miss Helen Louise Burr, 1893. 

In Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts, August 18, 1906, Mrs. 
Frances S. Edwards, mother of Miss Mary N. Edwards, 1888- 
89. 

In Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts, September 28, 1906, 
Charles T. Hardison, brother of Miss Matie L. Hardison, 1905. 

At Morgan Park, Illinois, February 28, 1906, Rev. L. G. 
Marsh, father of Miss Marion Marsh, 1880, Miss Grace Marsh, 
1885, and Miss Florence Marsh, 1892.